Undiagnosed Autism

and social struggles




go together. There are over 5 million adults in the USA today with autism (age 18 to 100).

Two tenths of one percent of adults in the USA are homeless. ( Gov’t statistics)
Some studies ( or ask a social worker in the field of homelessness) suggest the actual number is much higher.

Long term unemployment in the USA is around 1 percent.

9.3 percent of the population has a problem with substance abuse.

Studies link autism to a high ( up to 36 percent) percentage of autistic people within the socially struggling groups listed above).

Statistics in studies show that autistic people are more frequently victims of crimes.

Autistic people can be prone to trauma/cptsd/ptsd because of sensory differences and struggles to understand many social interactions or situations.

Admissions to hospitals for suicidal behavior/thoughts/ treatment have been documented to be so frequently related to autism that many hospitals now make mandatory testing for autism part of the initial admission procedure for this struggle.

Studies of autistic people related to health and longevity show greater risk for multiple health problems and shorter life expectancy.

To learn of our autism diagnosis is to open new opportunities for self understanding, self compassion, and self care.

Diagnosis provides insights that allow us to use new tools for self care and healing, both emotionally and physically.

Many autistic people struggle with missed or misdirected diagnosis, frequently reporting having multiple diagnoses which had been treated sometimes for years and don’t respond in the expected manner to psychological treatment, therapy, or drugs. When autism is discovered, many of the old diagnoses are no longer explanatory of the struggles the person experiences, autism fits the criteria better. (not always, it is very common to have multiple diagnoses and still be autistic) .

Knowing we are autistic allows us to get help for our struggles in a constructive manner with our self understanding and accommodations for our neurological struggles.

If you are struggling with social problems in any of these ways, or perhaps in multiple ways,
please check out the possibility that autism might be the answer you have been looking for.

2 thoughts on “Undiagnosed Autism

  1. “Autistic people can be prone to trauma/cptsd/ptsd because of sensory differences”

    How re-assuring :). I mean because I relate.

    “Admissions to hospitals for suicidal behavior/thoughts/ treatment have been documented to be so frequently related to autism that many hospitals now make mandatory testing for autism part of the initial admission procedure for this struggle.”

    I love this!

    Well I have to say I’ve ticked all of the boxes hereβ€” I’ve experienced significant amounts of every one! It’s really quite amazing and scary isn’t it.

    What I find fascinating is how many people I meet whom have autistic traits (or autism diagnoses) also have OCD behaviours or perfectionism. And the overlap with ADHD is huge (because of the executive function issues in common). I really think that the statistics of how many people with autism also meet OCD and ADHD criteria are much lower than the reality because OCD can also show so differently and is also very misunderstood.

    And honestly without my own research allowing me to point doctors and psychiatrists towards my eventual diagnoses, I can so easily see how convoluted a path I might have followed.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Thanks for Sharing this. It makes so much sense to me. I wish it was as β€œeasily” seen by more mental/medical health care professionals. I have been diagnosed with a host of differences by β€œprofessionals” and even though I have an official diagnosis of ASD1, (Aspergers) ADHD & SPD by a clinical psychologist that specialises in women/girls that trained under Prof Tony Attwood here in Australia, others (psychiatrists and my GP) have been determined that I am none of these and that I have CPTSD, PTSD or severe anxiety/depression, but definitely not anything I was diagnosed with. It’s so hard to feel understood, even when as a late
    Diagnosed Women that diagnosis finally made sense to all
    That is me.

    Liked by 2 people

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