What happened to all the autistic children?

They grew up to be adults!


Awareness is rising about autism and most people have heard of autism. Autism is primarily thought of as a children’s issue in the eye of the general public. What happens when these kids grow up? What happened to all the children who grew up before autism was commonly diagnosed in kids? They are now autistic adults!
If the CDC is right, there are well over 4 million autistic adults in the United States alone, and most of us have never suspected we are autistic.

How do we find autistic adults today?

Autistic people are more likely to be suicidal.

Autistic people are more likely to be victims of crime.


Autistic people have a higher rate of depression and anxiety.

Autistic people account for about 10 percent of admissions for treatment in rehab centers for alcohol and drugs ( compared to 1 percent of the general population admitted) This is truly stunning when you understand that autism is believed to affect 2.2 percent of the general population.

Autism may account for up to 10 percent or more of the homeless population.

Autism may be involved in those admitted to jails and prisons although very little or no research has been done specifically on autism. Intellectual disability in general has been studied as a factor in prison populations and shown to be present in higher than normal levels among the general population.

Autistic people tend to have poorer health and to die younger. Life expectancy in some studies is as low as 38 years. Other studies say around 58.

From these statements one can see how knowledge of autism would be particularly useful to certain groups. Doctors and health care workers of all types, law enforcement professionals, social workers, can you name others?

Diagnosis of autism as an adult can change lives. Self understanding is one of the keys to finding a new life amid common social struggles. Autistic people seem to have more than our share from a statistical reporting level at the very least. I can not tell you the huge difference my understanding of my own late diagnosis has made in my mundane and every day life. I can only imagine how useful such self knowledge can be to those struggling with such difficult issues in their lives, and how useful it would be to know and understand about how autism may have been involved in so many lives of pain and hardship.
I am reading of mandatory screening for autism in new hospital admissions for suicidal behaviors. I am reading of mandatory screening in clinical situations for care of those struggling with addictions.
I am grateful that professionals in some places are using today’s understanding of autism to help recognize and diagnose autistic adults. So much more needs to be done. Please help spread the word.

Autism hazards

How being autistic might predispose us to behavioral hazards.

I have spent quite a while trying to learn more about autism’s association with some of society’s most difficult struggles.

Exact numbers are difficult to gather, and the numbers give here have been extrapolated by averaging results of studies I examined.

There is much to be learned and decided, but there have been studies on autism and social struggles such as homelessness, substance abuse, eating disorders, suicide, crime rates, jail and prison time.

Here are some of the statistics I found, averaged by combining results, some were significantly higher or lower than the averages I quote here from each group of studies I looked at. I used studies done since 2015, and there was actually very little research done before this on the subject of autistic involvement in each of these social issues.

Autistic people are 7x more likely to struggle with substance abuse.

up to 12 percent of homeless people show features of autism in one recent study. T

here is still lack of much research being done in this area.

One survey of adults admitted for rehab in clinics across the country said up to 30 percent of the people admitted were autistic.

Up to 23 percent of admissions ( in a similar nationwide clinic survey ) for treatment of eating disorders were autistic.

Autistic people are 9x more likely to die by suicide, and studies report up to 60 percent have had suicidal thoughts or attempts.

Up to 40 percent of autistic people report strong symptoms of depression.

27 to 42 percent report struggles with anxiety

Most studies I looked at regarding crime and incarceration were based on general intellectual disabilities rather than on autism, so I will not comment on that, but I know there are new studies being done regarding those statistics and autism.

One thing I have observed is that today people being admitted for treatment for most of these struggles are often being screened for autism. This is not universal yet, but it is a trend which is being reported as recently as 2018 and continuing through today. I find that encouraging.

None of these numbers are scientific from the point of my collecting information and extracting information and averaging it.
I am not a scientist. I am a concerned old lady bystander hoping to bring information to light so that it can be used for better understanding of adult autism, better self understanding, and perhaps better lives through self knowledge and application of coping and survival skills or seeking help if one struggles with one or more of these issues.

You are not alone! there is help available. Please reach out and ask for help if you are struggling.

Crisis lines and local hospitals usually have lists of supports available in your area. Your doctor or social worker can also help you find what you need. Tell others in online autistic communities and ask how others have dealt with these issues. Reach out to family or a friend.
Just know you are not alone, and it is OK to admit you have struggles.
A better life is out there but you have to take that first step. I hope and pray that you do.